The People's Republic of China Consumer Protection Law -

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Federal and State Banking and Finance products for financial services professionals--compliance officers, attorneys, accountants. Bankruptcy court in Wilmington, Delaware and supported by 24 states, including Rhode Island, and the District of Columbia. Our website can hopefully be used as a resource for you even if we are unable to accept you as a client or you decide not to retain us to represent you. A consumer is defined as one who seeks or acquires by purchase or lease any goods or services.

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Publisher: Legal (November 1, 2013)

ISBN: 7511855245

Consumer protection legislation (Legislative analysis ; 95th Congress, no. 3)

Memorial Service - A ceremony commemorating the deceased without the body present. Memorial Society - A nonprofit organization that provides information about funerals and disposition but is not part of the State-regulated funeral industry. May also be called a funeral consumer alliance. Niche - A space in a columbarium, mausoleum, or niche wall to hold an urn. Private Cemetery - A cemetery regulated by the Bureau which is described as a burial park for earth interments or a mausoleum for crypt or vault interments and is owned and operated by a private corporation Opinions and Decisions of the Railroad Commission Volume 11. Axelrod Management Co. [cccxlii] and coop owners in Seecharin v. Radford Court Apartment Corp. [cccxliii] brought actions for damages done to their apartments by the negligence of landlords, managing agents or others, i.e., water damage from external or internal sources. Such a claim may invoke Real Property Law � 235-b [ � RPL � 235-b � ], a statutory warranty of habitability in every residential lease � that the premises...are fit for human habitation � Unfair and Deceptive Acts and Practices 2012: Includes Website. See our Privacy Policy and User Agreement for details. If you need an official copy, use the bilingual (PDF) version. This version is current as of September 30, 2016. It has been in effect since June 1, 2015. Note: Earlier consolidated versions are not available online. HER MAJESTY, by and with the advice and consent of the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba, enacts as follows: "consumer" means an individual who is or may become the consumer in a consumer transaction; (« consommateur ») "consumer transaction" means a transaction between a consumer and a supplier for the retail sale or lease or other retail commercial disposition, by the supplier to the consumer, of any goods, in the ordinary course of business of the supplier and primarily for the consumer's personal, family or household use; (« opération commerciale ») "court" means the Court of Queen's Bench; (« tribunal ») "director" means the Director of Business Practices appointed under Part II; (« directeur ») "goods" means goods or services that are or may become the subject of a consumer transaction; (« objets ») "minister" means the member of the Executive Council charged by the Lieutenant Governor in Council with the administration of this Act; (« ministre ») "publish" means to make public by or through any media; (« publier ») "supplier" means a person who, as principal or agent, is carrying on or is engaged in the business of (a) selling, leasing or otherwise disposing of goods on a retail basis, or "unfair business practice" means an unfair business practice within the meaning of section 2, 3 or 3.1. (« pratique commerciale déloyale ») (a) to do or say anything or to fail to do or say anything if, as a result, a consumer might reasonably be deceived or misled; or (b) to make a false claim or representation. 2(2) In determining whether anything is an unfair business practice within the meaning of subsection (1), the factors to be considered shall include the general impression given. 2(3) Without limiting the generality of subsection (1), any of the following representations, acts or omissions, when made or engaged in by a supplier in relation to goods or to a consumer transaction, is deemed for the purposes of this Act to be an unfair business practice within the meaning of that subsection: (a) a representation that the goods have sponsorship, approval, performance characteristics, accessories, ingredients, components, quantities, uses or benefits that they do not have; (b) a representation that the supplier has sponsorship, approval, status, affiliation or connection that the supplier does not have; (c) a representation that the goods are of a particular standard, quality, grade, style or model when they are not; (d) a representation that the goods are new or unused when they are not, or when they are in a deteriorated state, or have been altered or reconditioned, or have been reclaimed from a previous purchaser; (e) a false representation as to the extent to which the goods have been used; (f) a false representation as to the history or usage of the goods; (g) a false representation as to the reason the goods are available; (h) a false representation that the goods have been made available in accordance with a previous representation; (i) a representation that might reasonably lead a consumer to conclude that the goods are available in greater quantities than are in fact available from the supplier; (j) a representation that the goods are available, when the supplier has no intention of supplying or otherwise disposing of the goods as represented; (k) a false representation that a service, part or replacement of the goods, or the addition of new goods, or the repair of the goods, is necessary or desireable; (l) a representation that a price benefit or advantage exists with respect to the goods or with respect to the consumer transaction when it does not; (m) a representation that a solicitation of or any communication with a consumer is for a certain purpose or intent when it is not for that purpose or intent; (n) a false representation that the consumer transaction involves or does not involve rights, remedies or obligations; (o) a representation that a salesperson, representative, employee or agent has authority to negotiate the final terms of the consumer transaction when that person does not have that authority; (p) the use of exaggeration, innuendo or ambiguity as to a material fact, or the failure to disclose a material fact, with respect to the goods or with respect to the consumer transaction; (q) where the supplier gives a consumer an estimate of the price of the goods, demanding from the consumer a price that is materially higher than the estimate unless, prior to providing the goods, the supplier has obtained the consumer's express consent to that higher price; (r) where the price of a part of the consumer transaction is given in an advertisement, display or representation, not giving in that advertisement, display or representation reasonable prominence to the total price of the consumer transaction; (t) a false representation as to the purpose of a charge or proposed charge; (u) a false representation or the use of exaggeration as to the benefits that are likely to flow to a consumer if the consumer helps the supplier to obtain new or potential customers. (a) to take advantage of a consumer if the supplier knows or ought to have known that the consumer is not in a position to protect his or her own interests; or (b) to subject a consumer to undue pressure to enter into a consumer transaction. (a) a supplier takes advantage of a consumer if the supplier knows or ought to have known that the consumer was unable to protect, or incapable of protecting, his or her own interests because of the consumer's physical or mental infirmity, illiteracy, age or inability to understand the character, nature or language of the consumer transaction, or any other matter related to the transaction; or (b) the terms or conditions on which, or subject to which, the consumer entered into the consumer transaction are so adverse or so harsh to the consumer as to be inequitable. 3(3) In determining whether anything not described in subsection (2) is an unfair business practice within the meaning of subsection (1), all relevant circumstances shall be considered including, but not limited to, the following factors, if applicable: (a) whether there is a reasonable probability of full payment of the total price by the consumer; (b) whether the total price grossly exceeded the total price at which similar goods are readily obtainable in a similar transaction by like consumers. 3.1 It is an unfair business practice for a supplier to use its possession of or control over a consumer's goods to pressure the consumer into renegotiating a term or condition of a consumer transaction. 4 Any of the unfair business practices described in sections 2, 3 and 3.1 is an unfair business practice for the purposes of this Act, notwithstanding (a) that the unfair business practice is not directed at a specific consumer and does not occur in the course of or for the purposes of a specific consumer transaction but is directed to the public at large; and (b) that there is no privity of contract between the supplier and any specific consumer affected by the unfair business practice. 5 No supplier shall commit an unfair business practice. 6(1) Anything that would be an unfair business practice if committed by a supplier, is an unfair business practice if committed by the supplier's employee, and any court action or proceeding or order that may be taken or made against a supplier under this Act may be taken or made against the supplier's employee. 6(2) No employee of a supplier shall commit an unfair business practice. 6(3) Both the supplier and the employee are liable for any unfair business practice committed by the supplier's employee. 7 An unfair business practice may occur before, during or after a consumer transaction, and is an unfair business practice for all the purposes of this Act notwithstanding that no consumer transaction is in fact entered into or concluded. 8 A single representation, failure, act or thing within the meaning of section 2, 3 or 3.1 constitutes an unfair business practice for the purposes of this Act. 9(1) A person who, on behalf of a supplier, publishes an advertisement in good faith and in the ordinary course of business is not responsible under this Act for the truth or accuracy of any representation in the advertisement. 10 A Director of Business Practices and such other employees as may be necessary to administer this Act may be appointed under The Civil Service Act. 11 The director may delegate any of the director's powers or duties under this Act to an employee appointed under section 10. 12 The minister, with the approval of the Lieutenant Governor in Council, may appoint, engage or employ, and may fix the remuneration of, such part-time or full-time experts and other qualified persons, in addition to the persons appointed under section 10, as the minister deems necessary for the administration of this Act. (a) shall administer and enforce this Act and the regulations; (b) may inform consumers and suppliers of the provisions of this Act and the regulations and of their respective rights and duties thereunder; and (c) may receive, handle and mediate complaints respecting consumer transactions. 14(1) The director may attempt to resolve consumer complaints of unfair business practices by mediation. 14(2) The director may refuse to handle or mediate a complaint if the subject matter of the complaint more closely relates to other applicable federal or provincial legislation or to municipal by-laws, or for any other reason. 14.1(1) Subject to any conditions imposed by the director, where a complaint has been made or where the director believes it is necessary to determine whether a supplier is complying with this Act or the regulations, or an order made, or an assurance given, under this Act, a person authorized by the director (in this section and sections 14.2 and 14.3 referred to as an "inspector") may carry out any inspection, examination, audit or test reasonably required to (a) determine whether the supplier is in compliance; (b) verify the accuracy or completeness of a record or other information provided to the director or inspector; or (c) perform any other duty or function that the director or inspector considers necessary or advisable in the administration or enforcement of this Act or the regulations. 14.1(2) To perform a duty or function under subsection (1) (in this section and section 14.3 referred to as an "inspection"), the inspector may at any reasonable time, without a warrant, enter (a) any business premises of a supplier; or (b) any other premises or place where the inspector has reasonable grounds to believe that records or property relevant to the administration or enforcement of this Act are kept. 14.1(3) An inspector may not enter premises occupied as a private residence except with the consent of the owner or occupant or with the authority of a warrant obtained in accordance with section 14.3. 14.1(4) An inspector must show his or her identification if requested to do so in the context of an inspection. (a) produce or make available to the inspector all records and property that the inspector requires for the inspection; (b) provide any assistance or additional information, including personal information, that the inspector reasonably requires to carry out the inspection; and (c) upon request, provide written answers to questions asked by the inspector. 14.1(6) To inspect records that are maintained electronically at the place of inspection, the inspector may require the supplier or the person in charge of the place of inspection or having custody or control of the relevant records to produce the records in the form of a printout or to produce them in an electronically readable format. 14.1(7) The inspector may use equipment at the place of inspection to make copies of relevant records and may remove the copies from the place of inspection for further examination. 14.1(8) An inspector who is not able to make copies of records at the place of inspection may remove them from the place to make copies University of Wyoming College of Law Wyoming Law Review Vol 13 No 2 (special section: Consumer Protection Law) 2013 paperback.

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This law imposes damages on businesses who do anything that is considered deceptive and who intend that consumers will rely on their actions when making a purchase How to Keep Your Loved One Safe in a Wisconsin Nursing Home. I don't solicit anyone in Florida, all of my customers are out of state. It defines doing business in this state as a call from Florida or a call to a purchaser in Florida Bankruptcy Fundamentals for the Financial Services Industry: A Handbook for Non-lawyers. As part of its duties, the FTC investigates issues raised by consumers and businesses regarding several issues including false advertisement and all manners of consumer fraud. The government is aware that consumers are susceptible to being exploited by businesses or scammers and have put in place various safeguards for this reason, however, some people continue to abuse the rights of the consumer Blackstone's Statutes on Commercial and Consumer Law 2006-2007 (Blackstone's Statute Book Series). Does not cover rewards or loyalty cards, prepaid wireless telephone service cards, or cards that are useable at multiple unaffiliated merchants The European Consumer Citizen in Law and Policy (Consumption and Public Life) by Davies Jim (2011-10-15) Hardcover. Such offer or transaction need not involve the payment or promise of a consideration; (12) "participation" includes any form of submission; (13) "person" includes any individual, corporation, partnership, firm, association, institution, or public or private organization other than a Federal agency; (14) "State" means each of the several States of the United States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Canal Zone, Guam, American Samoa, and the Trust Territory on the Pacific Islands; and (15) "submission" means participation through the presentation or communication of relevant evidence, documents, arguments, or other information Commercial and Consumer Transactions : Secured Transactions and Insolvency Law. The way that the DTPA does this is by 1) allowing for double or triple damages to be paid and 2) requiring the business to pay for the consumer’s attorney’s fees Guide to Consumer Law : The Easyway - 2016 (Easyway Guides) by David Marsh (2016-01-25). Republic Act 7394 (RA 7394) is the "Consumer Act of the Philippines" which was promulgated on July 15, 1992. It is the policy of the State to protect the interest of the consumer, promote his general welfare and to establish standards of conduct for business and industry Regulating Consumer Product Safety. I am actually starting to see this could be a positive marketing tool when completed as long as we don't get too many actual complaints from customers. Your companies SEO skills are implicible..." Federal Trade Commission Act: Passed in which outlined federal guidlines that sellers must abide by A Guide to the Consumer Credit Jungle. Even a loan with a low monthly payment may add up to an inflated purchase price Blackstone's Statutes on Commercial and Consumer Law 2009-2010 (Blackstone's Statute Book Series). Each month our office receives more than 2,000 emails asking for help or information. We have found that many of the constituent inquiries fall into the same categories. In some cases, these inquires can more efficiently be handled by the agency that specializes in the area of the complaint. In order to help serve you in a more timely manner, we have provided answers to the most asked questions in each of these categories in Help by Topic Tilted: The Trials of Conrad Black, Second Edition by Steven Skurka (Oct 31 2011). Unfair Contract Terms Act 1977 Sale and Supply of Goods Act 1994, the Consumer Credit Act 1974 Consumer Protection Act 1987 Unfair Terms in Consumer Contracts Regulations 1999 Sale and Supply of Goods to Consumer Regulations 2002 The Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008 (SI 2008 /1277) Sale of Goods Act 1979 (“Soga”) 1. THE SALE OF GOODS ACT 1979 (“SOGA”) In order to understand SOGA it is worth understanding the various definitions used throughout SOGA, and indeed throughout the rest of this Chapter Unfair and Deceptive Acts and Practices (Consumer Credit and Sales Legal Practice Series).